Urgent need to revamp the school system and align it with values

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The evolution of the school system around the world has been focused on enhancing students’ ability to learn and turning them into smarter, more competitive and conscientious citizens. While the intentions of the education system today are very noble and commendable, they are fraught with some hard-hitting realities that are hard to ignore.

According to a study carried out NIMHANS, BangaloreAlmost one in five teenagers in India suffer from some degree of mental illness. Today’s teenagers are showing signs of risky behaviors such as substance abuse and speedy driving. Students today also face the brunt of “achievement pressure” that pushes them to extreme measures such as suicide. NKRB data shows that of the 1,53,052 people who committed suicide in 2020, an alarming 12,526 were students. Today’s students have been caught up in a never-ending rat race, where they are increasingly moving away from values ​​such as self-confidence, compassion, optimism, and even joy. The physical condition of students today is no better either. According to a recent study carried out ICMR, there are nearly 95,600 cases of type 1 diabetes among children under 14 years of age in India. All of this data is a clear indicator of how we are moving towards an unsustainable society that is raising a weakened and repressed youth.

One of the reasons for this state of affairs can be explained by the increased attention of schools to academic learning, rather than to fundamental values ​​or the physical and mental well-being of students. There is an urgent need to reshape the school system and align it with values ​​that help increase resilience and focus. One way to achieve this goal could be to integrate Ayush values ​​into the school system.

Yoga, for example, is a great way to ensure the physical and mental well-being of students. Encouraging students to do yoga at an early age will not only help them build immunity, but it will also help them focus. The researchers suggest that yoga strongly influences neural patterns in the brain, which may improve the ability to concentrate. Today’s children also suffer from ADHD, a cognitive disorder that often leads to anxiety, chronic stress, and sleep problems. Such disorders also have far-reaching consequences for the relationship between parent and child. Yoga classes help to increase the level of dopamine and serotonin, which helps to relax.

Students who often lack energy see the consequences of this for their grades and relationships in society. Research conducted University of Waterloo found that hatha yoga significantly increased participants’ energy levels, further helping them focus and improve brain function. Healthy students form the basis of a healthy society. Physically and mentally healthy youth lay the foundation for building a healthy society that builds a prosperous nation.

Remembering the benefits of practice Government of Haryana introduced yoga to the public school curriculum for grades I through X. Government of Uttar Pradesh also plans to include yoga and sports in the school curriculum. To increase the interest of young people, yoga asanas have been declared a competitive sport by the Government of India. More than 1,000 universities, 30,000 colleges and 24,000 CBSE affiliated schools have been made aware of the Common Yoga Protocol (CYP) and its benefits for youth.

Our ancient texts suggest that values ​​such as brotherhood, love and discipline formed the basis of the education system gurukulas. Emphasis on art, sports, singing, yoga and meditation in the natural environment has helped shishya (students) develop creativity, positivity and critical thinking. One of the great examples of a healthy relationship fostered by a supportive environment gurukul is friendship between Krishna as well as Sudama. The feeling of resilience helped Sudama face difficult circumstances. Compassion and love under the guidance Krishna to help his friend out of his suffering. The ancient system focused on building a strong character that remained steadfast in the face of painful trials. These should be the focus of today’s school system. Today, the Ayush system corresponds to ancient values, creating a moral consciousness and ethically teaching students.

The recently held Global Summit on Ayush and Innovation brought together a huge number of students from various institutes of yoga, naturopathy and homeopathy. The interest in this event shows that the ancient system of traditional medicine in India is increasingly attracting the attention of the younger generation. Interestingly, one of the startups called Green Forest Wellness that managed to secure INR 2.5 crore funding at the event is owned by a student from the Institute for Training and Research in Ayurveda (ITRA), Gujarat.

While the New Education Policy aims to create an education system that promotes marketable skills among young people, we must also focus on creating a supportive environment for students who care about their mental and physical well-being. While the yoga system is being adopted by public schools, private schools should also focus on building a curriculum based on yoga’s fundamental values ​​for humanity.

The evolution of the school system around the world has been focused on enhancing students’ ability to learn and turning them into smarter, more competitive and conscientious citizens. While the intentions of the education system today are very noble and commendable, they are fraught with some hard-hitting realities that are hard to ignore.

According to a study carried out NIMHANS, BangaloreAlmost one in five teenagers in India suffer from some degree of mental illness. Today’s teenagers are showing signs of risky behaviors such as substance abuse and speedy driving. Students today also face the brunt of “achievement pressure” that pushes them to extreme measures such as suicide. NKRB data shows that of the 1,53,052 people who committed suicide in 2020, an alarming 12,526 were students. Today’s students have been caught up in a never-ending rat race, where they are increasingly moving away from values ​​such as self-confidence, compassion, optimism, and even joy. The physical condition of students today is no better either. According to a recent study carried out ICMR, there are nearly 95,600 cases of type 1 diabetes among children under 14 years of age in India. All of this data is a clear indicator of how we are moving towards an unsustainable society that is raising a weakened and repressed youth.

One of the reasons for this state of affairs can be explained by the increased attention of schools to academic learning, rather than to fundamental values ​​or the physical and mental well-being of students. There is an urgent need to reshape the school system and align it with values ​​that help increase resilience and focus. One way to achieve this goal could be to integrate Ayush values ​​into the school system.

Yoga, for example, is a great way to ensure the physical and mental well-being of students. Encouraging students to do yoga at an early age will not only help them build immunity, but it will also help them focus. The researchers suggest that yoga strongly influences neural patterns in the brain, which may improve the ability to concentrate. Today’s children also suffer from ADHD, a cognitive disorder that often leads to anxiety, chronic stress, and sleep problems. Such disorders also have far-reaching consequences for the relationship between parent and child. Yoga classes help to increase the level of dopamine and serotonin, which helps to relax.

Students who often lack energy see the consequences of this for their grades and relationships in society. Research conducted University of Waterloo found that hatha yoga significantly increased participants’ energy levels, further helping them focus and improve brain function. Healthy students form the basis of a healthy society. Physically and mentally healthy youth lay the foundation for building a healthy society that builds a prosperous nation.

Remembering the benefits of practice Government of Haryana introduced yoga to the public school curriculum for grades I through X. Government of Uttar Pradesh also plans to include yoga and sports in the school curriculum. To increase the interest of young people, yoga asanas have been declared a competitive sport by the Government of India. More than 1,000 universities, 30,000 colleges and 24,000 CBSE affiliated schools have been made aware of the Common Yoga Protocol (CYP) and its benefits for youth.

Our ancient texts suggest that values ​​such as brotherhood, love and discipline formed the basis of the education system gurukulas. Emphasis on art, sports, singing, yoga and meditation in the natural environment has helped shishya (students) develop creativity, positivity and critical thinking. One of the great examples of a healthy relationship fostered by a supportive environment gurukul is friendship between Krishna as well as Sudama. The feeling of resilience helped Sudama face difficult circumstances. Compassion and love under the guidance Krishna to help his friend out of his suffering. The ancient system focused on building a strong character that remained steadfast in the face of painful trials. These should be the focus of today’s school system. Today, the Ayush system corresponds to ancient values, creating a moral consciousness and ethically teaching students.

The recently held Global Summit on Ayush and Innovation brought together a huge number of students from various institutes of yoga, naturopathy and homeopathy. The interest in this event shows that the ancient system of traditional medicine in India is increasingly attracting the attention of the younger generation. Interestingly, one of the startups called Green Forest Wellness that managed to secure INR 2.5 crore funding at the event is owned by a student from the Institute for Training and Research in Ayurveda (ITRA), Gujarat.

While the New Education Policy aims to create an education system that promotes marketable skills among young people, we must also focus on creating a supportive environment for students who care about their mental and physical well-being. While the yoga system is being adopted by public schools, private schools should also focus on building a curriculum based on yoga’s fundamental values ​​for humanity.

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